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The Birchanger Woods Trust
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Millenium Hornbeam Coppice and Spanish Sweet Chestnut Bench
The two hornbeams were coppiced before and after the millenium.   See if you can figure out which one was coppiced first.

Whilst you contemplate this problem, you may wish to rest on the bench which is made from Spanish Sweet Chestnut.  The Romans introduced Spanish Sweet Chestnut to the UK for food and use as timber.  This tree responds very well to coppicing, which is still practised in Britain, and produces a good crop of tannin-rich wood every 12 to 30 years, depending on intended use and local growth rate. The tannin renders the young growing wood durable and resistant to outdoor use, thus suitable for posts, fencing or stakes. The wood is of light colour, hard and strong. It is used to make furniture, barrels (sometimes used to age balsamic vinegar), and roof beams notably in southern Europe. The timber due to its durability in ground contact is often used for external purposes such as fencing.  It is also a good fuel, though not favoured for open fires as it tends to spit.