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The Birchanger Woods Trust
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The photograph shows a mature Standel or Standard Oak which has been left uncut to be grown on for timber.   This ia a large straight Oak tree which will be preserved for future generations to enjoy.

Background of Coppice with standards
A statute of Henry VIII, required woods to be enclosed after cutting (to prevent browsing by animals) and 12 standels (standards or mature uncut trees) to be left in each acre, to be grown into timber. The variation of coppicing known as coppice with standards (scattered individual stems allowed to grow on through several coppice cycles) has been commonly used throughout most of Europe as a means of giving greater flexibility in the resulting forest product from any one area. The woodland provides not only the small material from the coppice but also a range of larger timber for jobs like house building, bridge repair, cart-making and so on.